Place Details

Place Details

Yusupov Palace

The Yusupov Palace, located on the banks of the Moika River, is a historical architectural monument, which is often called a reference book for the aristocratic interior of St. Petersburg. This is not surprising, because the palace belonged to five generations of the Yusupov family.

At the very beginning of the 18th century, the house of Praskovya Ioannovna, who was Peter the Great's niece, was located on the bank of the Moika River. Later, she gave this estate to Count Shuvalov, who threw luxurious banquets and arranged lavish receptions here. Shuvalov's son in the 70s of the XVIII century built a mansion in the shape of the letter “P”, located upstream, with a triumphal arch-gate, which have survived to the present day. At the end of the XVIII century, the building became the property of Prince Potemkin's niece, and in 1830 it was bought by Yusupov.

The Yusupov family has deep roots and originates from the sons of Yusuf, Sultan of the Nogai Horde. His great-grandson, having been baptized, took the name Dmitry. Dmitry's son Grigory Yusupov served in the rank of general and was the closest ally of Peter I, and his grandson Nikolai was presented to all existing Russian orders at that time. Especially for him, they even came up with a special award — a pearl epaulette. The Yusupov family was one of the wealthiest in the Russian Empire, with more than 50 palaces at its disposal, including four in the Northern Capital.

Over two centuries, the palace has been rebuilt more than once, its interior has changed, new buildings, gardens and greenhouses have appeared. The halls differed from each other in different architectural styles: here you can find elements of neoclassicism, Russian Empire style, and neorococo. On the threshold of the 20th century, electricity, water supply, sewerage and water heating were installed in the Yusupov Palace. It is worth paying attention to the famous home theater, which amazes with its luxury and solemnity. It usually hosted social events and receptions for members of the royal family.

But the facade of the palace is surprisingly modest. The fact is that it was built on a rather small plot, where there was no place to swing.

After the October Revolution, the Palace housed the Museum of Noble Life, and all the interiors remained unchanged. Excursions were held here, and the room in which the favorite of the royal family Grigory Rasputin was killed was of particular interest.

Now the palace is open to everyone who wants to admire its decoration and graceful things of the past.

The Yusupov Palace, located on the banks of the Moika River, is a historical architectural monument, which is often called a reference book for the aristocratic interior of St. Petersburg. This is not surprising, because the palace belonged to five generations of the Yusupov family.

At the very beginning of the 18th century, the house of Praskovya Ioannovna, who was Peter the Great's niece, was located on the bank of the Moika River. Later, she gave this estate to Count Shuvalov, who threw luxurious banquets and arranged lavish receptions here. Shuvalov's son in the 70s of the XVIII century built a mansion in the shape of the letter “P”, located upstream, with a triumphal arch-gate, which have survived to the present day. At the end of the XVIII century, the building became the property of Prince Potemkin's niece, and in 1830 it was bought by Yusupov.

The Yusupov family has deep roots and originates from the sons of Yusuf, Sultan of the Nogai Horde. His great-grandson, having been baptized, took the name Dmitry. Dmitry's son Grigory Yusupov served in the rank of general and was the closest ally of Peter I, and his grandson Nikolai was presented to all existing Russian orders at that time. Especially for him, they even came up with a special award — a pearl epaulette. The Yusupov family was one of the wealthiest in the Russian Empire, with more than 50 palaces at its disposal, including four in the Northern Capital.

Over two centuries, the palace has been rebuilt more than once, its interior has changed, new buildings, gardens and greenhouses have appeared. The halls differed from each other in different architectural styles: here you can find elements of neoclassicism, Russian Empire style, and neorococo. On the threshold of the 20th century, electricity, water supply, sewerage and water heating were installed in the Yusupov Palace. It is worth paying attention to the famous home theater, which amazes with its luxury and solemnity. It usually hosted social events and receptions for members of the royal family.

But the facade of the palace is surprisingly modest. The fact is that it was built on a rather small plot, where there was no place to swing.

After the October Revolution, the Palace housed the Museum of Noble Life, and all the interiors remained unchanged. Excursions were held here, and the room in which the favorite of the royal family Grigory Rasputin was killed was of particular interest.

Now the palace is open to everyone who wants to admire its decoration and graceful things of the past.

The Yusupov Palace, located on the banks of the Moika River, is a historical architectural monument, which is often called a reference book for the aristocratic interior of St. Petersburg. This is not surprising, because the palace belonged to five generations of the Yusupov family.

At the very beginning of the 18th century, the house of Praskovya Ioannovna, who was Peter the Great's niece, was located on the bank of the Moika River. Later, she gave this estate to Count Shuvalov, who threw luxurious banquets and arranged lavish receptions here. Shuvalov's son in the 70s of the XVIII century built a mansion in the shape of the letter “P”, located upstream, with a triumphal arch-gate, which have survived to the present day. At the end of the XVIII century, the building became the property of Prince Potemkin's niece, and in 1830 it was bought by Yusupov.

The Yusupov family has deep roots and originates from the sons of Yusuf, Sultan of the Nogai Horde. His great-grandson, having been baptized, took the name Dmitry. Dmitry's son Grigory Yusupov served in the rank of general and was the closest ally of Peter I, and his grandson Nikolai was presented to all existing Russian orders at that time. Especially for him, they even came up with a special award — a pearl epaulette. The Yusupov family was one of the wealthiest in the Russian Empire, with more than 50 palaces at its disposal, including four in the Northern Capital.

Over two centuries, the palace has been rebuilt more than once, its interior has changed, new buildings, gardens and greenhouses have appeared. The halls differed from each other in different architectural styles: here you can find elements of neoclassicism, Russian Empire style, and neorococo. On the threshold of the 20th century, electricity, water supply, sewerage and water heating were installed in the Yusupov Palace. It is worth paying attention to the famous home theater, which amazes with its luxury and solemnity. It usually hosted social events and receptions for members of the royal family.

But the facade of the palace is surprisingly modest. The fact is that it was built on a rather small plot, where there was no place to swing.

After the October Revolution, the Palace housed the Museum of Noble Life, and all the interiors remained unchanged. Excursions were held here, and the room in which the favorite of the royal family Grigory Rasputin was killed was of particular interest.

Now the palace is open to everyone who wants to admire its decoration and graceful things of the past.

Address

94, Moika River Embankment

Timetable

daily 10:00am — 7:30pm (ticket office: daily 9:30am — 6:00pm)

Phone

+7 812 314-98-83

Website

http://www.yusupov-palace.ru/

Source

https://kudago.com/spb/place/yusupovskij-dvorec/

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