Place Details

Place Details

Jewish Community Center

Currently, there are two such centers in the Northern capital. One of them is located in the historical part of the city, not far from Nevsky Prospect. It belongs to the synagogue on Lermontovsky Avenue, building 2.

Its building was built in an unusual Moorish style for St. Petersburg. It was designed by famous architects L. I. Bakhman and I. I. Shaposhnikov, as well as V. Stasov and N. Benoit.

The synagogue has been operating since 1893, although in 1930 the Bolsheviks closed it, but under the influence of the community, services resumed in six months. The sixties and seventies of the twentieth century were also difficult for the religious Jewish congregation, when the authorities prevented the involvement of young people in religion. However, the Jewish community kept and maintained its traditions.

Back in 1904, the Choral Synagogue hosted an exhibition of exhibits about the life of Russian Jews, which has become a permanent exhibition since 1916. Since the beginning of the twentieth century, the community has taken care of the development of education. It opened a Jewish university, vocational schools, and a society of Jewish folk music. These areas continue to develop in the community center to this day.

There is also a library with literature and periodicals in Yiddish and Hebrew, festivals, concerts, contemporary art exhibits, and Sunday classes for children school.

Currently, there are two such centers in the Northern capital. One of them is located in the historical part of the city, not far from Nevsky Prospect. It belongs to the synagogue on Lermontovsky Avenue, building 2.

Its building was built in an unusual Moorish style for St. Petersburg. It was designed by famous architects L. I. Bakhman and I. I. Shaposhnikov, as well as V. Stasov and N. Benoit.

The synagogue has been operating since 1893, although in 1930 the Bolsheviks closed it, but under the influence of the community, services resumed in six months. The sixties and seventies of the twentieth century were also difficult for the religious Jewish congregation, when the authorities prevented the involvement of young people in religion. However, the Jewish community kept and maintained its traditions.

Back in 1904, the Choral Synagogue hosted an exhibition of exhibits about the life of Russian Jews, which has become a permanent exhibition since 1916. Since the beginning of the twentieth century, the community has taken care of the development of education. It opened a Jewish university, vocational schools, and a society of Jewish folk music. These areas continue to develop in the community center to this day.

There is also a library with literature and periodicals in Yiddish and Hebrew, festivals, concerts, contemporary art exhibits, and Sunday classes for children school.

Currently, there are two such centers in the Northern capital. One of them is located in the historical part of the city, not far from Nevsky Prospect. It belongs to the synagogue on Lermontovsky Avenue, building 2.

Its building was built in an unusual Moorish style for St. Petersburg. It was designed by famous architects L. I. Bakhman and I. I. Shaposhnikov, as well as V. Stasov and N. Benoit.

The synagogue has been operating since 1893, although in 1930 the Bolsheviks closed it, but under the influence of the community, services resumed in six months. The sixties and seventies of the twentieth century were also difficult for the religious Jewish congregation, when the authorities prevented the involvement of young people in religion. However, the Jewish community kept and maintained its traditions.

Back in 1904, the Choral Synagogue hosted an exhibition of exhibits about the life of Russian Jews, which has become a permanent exhibition since 1916. Since the beginning of the twentieth century, the community has taken care of the development of education. It opened a Jewish university, vocational schools, and a society of Jewish folk music. These areas continue to develop in the community center to this day.

There is also a library with literature and periodicals in Yiddish and Hebrew, festivals, concerts, contemporary art exhibits, and Sunday classes for children school.

Address

Lermontovsky Prospekt, 2

Timetable

Mon—Thu 16:00 — 20:00 Sun 13:00 — 17:00

Phone

+7 812 713-38-89

Source

https://kudago.com/spb/place/evrejskij-obshinnyj-centr/

Map

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