Place Details

Place Details

Muruzi house

The Moorish facade, numerous bay windows and niches, balconies decorated with terracotta columns, horseshoe-shaped arches and stylized inscriptions involuntarily attract the attention of passers-by. Corner towers give special expressiveness to the appearance of the building. A remarkable feature completes the overall picture of "unusualness": Muruzi's house is listed at three addresses at once. You can get to it along Liteiny Prospekt (building 24), Pestelya Street (building 27) and Korolenko Street (building 14).

Since the start of construction work in 1875, the tenement house on Liteiny has aroused the undying interest of St. Petersburg residents and the local press. this is not surprising: the Muruzi family spent almost all their savings on its construction.Three years later, on the site of a small house, a luxurious mansion was built, equipped "with the latest technology. There was heating, plumbing, and a steam laundry. Future residents could enjoy swimming in one of the 28 bathrooms.

However, the most luxurious decoration was hidden by 26 bathrooms. room apartment in the mezzanine. To visit the owners, one had to climb a staircase of white Carrara marble and enter a hall designed in the style of Moorish palace courtyards. Its vaults rested on 24 thin marble columns, and a real fountain beat in the center of the hall. Other rooms sported rococo and oriental-style interiors, as well as oak and marble fireplaces.

Throughout its history, Muruzi's house has been especially popular among the literary elite of St. Petersburg. His predecessor also appeared in [Dostoevsky's] novel (http://kudago.com/spb/list/peterburg-dostoevskogo/) "Idiot" and Kuprin's story "Garnet Bracelet" as the house of General Yepanchin.

In different centuries, Major General Alexander Alexandrovich Pushkin, the eldest son of the great poet, Nikolai Leskov, Dmitry Merezhkovsky and Zinaida Gippius, Maxim Gorky, Alexander Blok and others managed to visit and even live in the most profitable house in different centuries. In the early 1900s, in the apartment of Nikolai Fedorovich Annensky, brother of Innokenty Annensky, meetings of writers close to the populist magazine Russkoye Bogatstvo were held, and the former apartment of the Merezhkovsky literary couple eventually turned into a St. Petersburg salon of symbolism. After the revolution, one of the apartments of the Muruzi house, on the initiative of Korney Chukovsky, gave shelter to the studio of young translators at the publishing house World Literature.

After the Great Patriotic War, Joseph Brodsky and his parents lived in one of the communal apartments of this house. The "one and a half rooms" they occupied are as legendary as [Raskolnikov's] closet (http://kudago.com/spb/place/dom-rodiona-raskolnikova/), with the only difference that the family huddled here in real life from 1949 to 1972. This communal apartment was finally settled only in 2010, in 2020 the museum of the poet ["One and a half rooms"] was opened in it (https://kudago.com/spb/place/muzej-poltoryi-komnatyi/).

The Moorish facade, numerous bay windows and niches, balconies decorated with terracotta columns, horseshoe-shaped arches and stylized inscriptions involuntarily attract the attention of passers-by. Corner towers give special expressiveness to the appearance of the building. A remarkable feature completes the overall picture of "unusualness": Muruzi's house is listed at three addresses at once. You can get to it along Liteiny Prospekt (building 24), Pestelya Street (building 27) and Korolenko Street (building 14).

Since the start of construction work in 1875, the tenement house on Liteiny has aroused the undying interest of St. Petersburg residents and the local press. this is not surprising: the Muruzi family spent almost all their savings on its construction.Three years later, on the site of a small house, a luxurious mansion was built, equipped "with the latest technology. There was heating, plumbing, and a steam laundry. Future residents could enjoy swimming in one of the 28 bathrooms.

However, the most luxurious decoration was hidden by 26 bathrooms. room apartment in the mezzanine. To visit the owners, one had to climb a staircase of white Carrara marble and enter a hall designed in the style of Moorish palace courtyards. Its vaults rested on 24 thin marble columns, and a real fountain beat in the center of the hall. Other rooms sported rococo and oriental-style interiors, as well as oak and marble fireplaces.

Throughout its history, Muruzi's house has been especially popular among the literary elite of St. Petersburg. His predecessor also appeared in [Dostoevsky's] novel (http://kudago.com/spb/list/peterburg-dostoevskogo/) "Idiot" and Kuprin's story "Garnet Bracelet" as the house of General Yepanchin.

In different centuries, Major General Alexander Alexandrovich Pushkin, the eldest son of the great poet, Nikolai Leskov, Dmitry Merezhkovsky and Zinaida Gippius, Maxim Gorky, Alexander Blok and others managed to visit and even live in the most profitable house in different centuries. In the early 1900s, in the apartment of Nikolai Fedorovich Annensky, brother of Innokenty Annensky, meetings of writers close to the populist magazine Russkoye Bogatstvo were held, and the former apartment of the Merezhkovsky literary couple eventually turned into a St. Petersburg salon of symbolism. After the revolution, one of the apartments of the Muruzi house, on the initiative of Korney Chukovsky, gave shelter to the studio of young translators at the publishing house World Literature.

After the Great Patriotic War, Joseph Brodsky and his parents lived in one of the communal apartments of this house. The "one and a half rooms" they occupied are as legendary as [Raskolnikov's] closet (http://kudago.com/spb/place/dom-rodiona-raskolnikova/), with the only difference that the family huddled here in real life from 1949 to 1972. This communal apartment was finally settled only in 2010, in 2020 the museum of the poet ["One and a half rooms"] was opened in it (https://kudago.com/spb/place/muzej-poltoryi-komnatyi/).

The Moorish facade, numerous bay windows and niches, balconies decorated with terracotta columns, horseshoe-shaped arches and stylized inscriptions involuntarily attract the attention of passers-by. Corner towers give special expressiveness to the appearance of the building. A remarkable feature completes the overall picture of "unusualness": Muruzi's house is listed at three addresses at once. You can get to it along Liteiny Prospekt (building 24), Pestelya Street (building 27) and Korolenko Street (building 14).

Since the start of construction work in 1875, the tenement house on Liteiny has aroused the undying interest of St. Petersburg residents and the local press. this is not surprising: the Muruzi family spent almost all their savings on its construction.Three years later, on the site of a small house, a luxurious mansion was built, equipped "with the latest technology. There was heating, plumbing, and a steam laundry. Future residents could enjoy swimming in one of the 28 bathrooms.

However, the most luxurious decoration was hidden by 26 bathrooms. room apartment in the mezzanine. To visit the owners, one had to climb a staircase of white Carrara marble and enter a hall designed in the style of Moorish palace courtyards. Its vaults rested on 24 thin marble columns, and a real fountain beat in the center of the hall. Other rooms sported rococo and oriental-style interiors, as well as oak and marble fireplaces.

Throughout its history, Muruzi's house has been especially popular among the literary elite of St. Petersburg. His predecessor also appeared in [Dostoevsky's] novel (http://kudago.com/spb/list/peterburg-dostoevskogo/) "Idiot" and Kuprin's story "Garnet Bracelet" as the house of General Yepanchin.

In different centuries, Major General Alexander Alexandrovich Pushkin, the eldest son of the great poet, Nikolai Leskov, Dmitry Merezhkovsky and Zinaida Gippius, Maxim Gorky, Alexander Blok and others managed to visit and even live in the most profitable house in different centuries. In the early 1900s, in the apartment of Nikolai Fedorovich Annensky, brother of Innokenty Annensky, meetings of writers close to the populist magazine Russkoye Bogatstvo were held, and the former apartment of the Merezhkovsky literary couple eventually turned into a St. Petersburg salon of symbolism. After the revolution, one of the apartments of the Muruzi house, on the initiative of Korney Chukovsky, gave shelter to the studio of young translators at the publishing house World Literature.

After the Great Patriotic War, Joseph Brodsky and his parents lived in one of the communal apartments of this house. The "one and a half rooms" they occupied are as legendary as [Raskolnikov's] closet (http://kudago.com/spb/place/dom-rodiona-raskolnikova/), with the only difference that the family huddled here in real life from 1949 to 1972. This communal apartment was finally settled only in 2010, in 2020 the museum of the poet ["One and a half rooms"] was opened in it (https://kudago.com/spb/place/muzej-poltoryi-komnatyi/).

Address

prosp. Liteiny, 24

Source

https://kudago.com/spb/place/dom-muruzi-spb/

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