Place Details

Place Details

Pushkin's places on Bolshaya Dmitrovka Street

His friend Fedor Gagarin, who visited the poet, lived here. In the house number one on this street there was the Noble Assembly, where concerts, performances, balls, social communication were held. Pushkin recalled that in winter, nobles from the provinces came to Moscow, and up to five thousand people gathered in the Assembly of the Nobility twice a week. There was a Moscow bride exhibition here, and brilliant gentlemen came here from St. Petersburg. The building has been rebuilt several times since the time of Pushkin, and the Hall of Columns, the main attraction of the building, has been preserved unchanged to this day with twenty-eight columns made of artificial marble, crystal chandeliers and tall wall mirrors.

Another building has also been preserved on Bolshaya Dmitrovka, infamous as the place where Pushkin lost as much as twenty-five thousand rubles to the avid gambler living there V.S. Ogon-Doganovsky, a debt that the poet could not fully return until his death. This happened in the house of General E.P. Glebova-Streshneva, located in the courtyard of house number seven. This story formed the basis of the plot of “The Queen of Spades”, and Ogon-Doganovsky became the prototype of Chekalinsky, a professional player.

By the way, in 1866, L. N. Tolstoy, creating the epoch-making epic novel War and Peace, rented six rooms of this house for his office. Currently, the building is in disrepair and may be included in the list of irretrievably lost architectural monuments.

His friend Fedor Gagarin, who visited the poet, lived here. In the house number one on this street there was the Noble Assembly, where concerts, performances, balls, social communication were held. Pushkin recalled that in winter, nobles from the provinces came to Moscow, and up to five thousand people gathered in the Assembly of the Nobility twice a week. There was a Moscow bride exhibition here, and brilliant gentlemen came here from St. Petersburg. The building has been rebuilt several times since the time of Pushkin, and the Hall of Columns, the main attraction of the building, has been preserved unchanged to this day with twenty-eight columns made of artificial marble, crystal chandeliers and tall wall mirrors.

Another building has also been preserved on Bolshaya Dmitrovka, infamous as the place where Pushkin lost as much as twenty-five thousand rubles to the avid gambler living there V.S. Ogon-Doganovsky, a debt that the poet could not fully return until his death. This happened in the house of General E.P. Glebova-Streshneva, located in the courtyard of house number seven. This story formed the basis of the plot of “The Queen of Spades”, and Ogon-Doganovsky became the prototype of Chekalinsky, a professional player.

By the way, in 1866, L. N. Tolstoy, creating the epoch-making epic novel War and Peace, rented six rooms of this house for his office. Currently, the building is in disrepair and may be included in the list of irretrievably lost architectural monuments.

His friend Fedor Gagarin, who visited the poet, lived here. In the house number one on this street there was the Noble Assembly, where concerts, performances, balls, social communication were held. Pushkin recalled that in winter, nobles from the provinces came to Moscow, and up to five thousand people gathered in the Assembly of the Nobility twice a week. There was a Moscow bride exhibition here, and brilliant gentlemen came here from St. Petersburg. The building has been rebuilt several times since the time of Pushkin, and the Hall of Columns, the main attraction of the building, has been preserved unchanged to this day with twenty-eight columns made of artificial marble, crystal chandeliers and tall wall mirrors.

Another building has also been preserved on Bolshaya Dmitrovka, infamous as the place where Pushkin lost as much as twenty-five thousand rubles to the avid gambler living there V.S. Ogon-Doganovsky, a debt that the poet could not fully return until his death. This happened in the house of General E.P. Glebova-Streshneva, located in the courtyard of house number seven. This story formed the basis of the plot of “The Queen of Spades”, and Ogon-Doganovsky became the prototype of Chekalinsky, a professional player.

By the way, in 1866, L. N. Tolstoy, creating the epoch-making epic novel War and Peace, rented six rooms of this house for his office. Currently, the building is in disrepair and may be included in the list of irretrievably lost architectural monuments.

Address

st. Bolshaya Dmitrovka

Source

https://kudago.com/msk/place/ulica-bolshaya-dmitrovka/

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