Place Details

Place Details

Stoleshnikov alley

The very first mention of Stoleshnikov Lane dates back to the beginning of the 16th century. These were the times when Grand Duke Ivan III Vasilyevich ruled Moscow lands. The name of this ruler is associated with the final liberation of the Russian state from the raids of the Tatar-Mongolian horde. The lane owes its name to the countertop weavers who lived on its territory, who were engaged in the production of tablecloths for the royal court.

Since the 18th century, this cozy, very uncrowded and green street began to attract representatives of the Moscow nobility. The capital's elite, after a while, almost completely “occupied” Stoleshnikov Lane. The old wooden buildings, which had been located here for many years, were moved, and in their place were erected stone chambers of representatives of the upper class of the capital's society — Princes Dolgorukov, Trubetskoy, Kozlovsky and other wealthy people.

The Patriotic War of 1812 made significant adjustments to the architectural appearance of Moscow, and Stoleshnikov Lane was also affected by the disaster. As a result of the largest fire in the centuries-old history of the Russian capital, which occurred due to the fault of French soldiers, all the wooden buildings densely huddled along the alley were destroyed. After these historic events, all the buildings in the alley were built of stone. In the second half of the 19th century, Stoleshnikov Lane began to gradually turn into shopping arcades. Over the years, many shops of various profiles and all kinds of merchant shops have been located here: rich people and their wives came from all over Moscow to get to the sale. People of lesser incomes were also in a hurry here to buy some goods that were stale on the shelves at a bargain price.

After the revolutionary events of 1917, when the Bolsheviks came to power, all shops and shops were converted into warehouses. However, when the regime of “war communism” began to decline, Stoleshnikov Lane again sparkled with shop windows.

Today, the lane is popular not only among shoppers, but this quiet place is ideal for romantic dates and leisurely walks in the historical center of Moscow.

The very first mention of Stoleshnikov Lane dates back to the beginning of the 16th century. These were the times when Grand Duke Ivan III Vasilyevich ruled Moscow lands. The name of this ruler is associated with the final liberation of the Russian state from the raids of the Tatar-Mongolian horde. The lane owes its name to the countertop weavers who lived on its territory, who were engaged in the production of tablecloths for the royal court.

Since the 18th century, this cozy, very uncrowded and green street began to attract representatives of the Moscow nobility. The capital's elite, after a while, almost completely “occupied” Stoleshnikov Lane. The old wooden buildings, which had been located here for many years, were moved, and in their place were erected stone chambers of representatives of the upper class of the capital's society — Princes Dolgorukov, Trubetskoy, Kozlovsky and other wealthy people.

The Patriotic War of 1812 made significant adjustments to the architectural appearance of Moscow, and Stoleshnikov Lane was also affected by the disaster. As a result of the largest fire in the centuries-old history of the Russian capital, which occurred due to the fault of French soldiers, all the wooden buildings densely huddled along the alley were destroyed. After these historic events, all the buildings in the alley were built of stone. In the second half of the 19th century, Stoleshnikov Lane began to gradually turn into shopping arcades. Over the years, many shops of various profiles and all kinds of merchant shops have been located here: rich people and their wives came from all over Moscow to get to the sale. People of lesser incomes were also in a hurry here to buy some goods that were stale on the shelves at a bargain price.

After the revolutionary events of 1917, when the Bolsheviks came to power, all shops and shops were converted into warehouses. However, when the regime of “war communism” began to decline, Stoleshnikov Lane again sparkled with shop windows.

Today, the lane is popular not only among shoppers, but this quiet place is ideal for romantic dates and leisurely walks in the historical center of Moscow.

The very first mention of Stoleshnikov Lane dates back to the beginning of the 16th century. These were the times when Grand Duke Ivan III Vasilyevich ruled Moscow lands. The name of this ruler is associated with the final liberation of the Russian state from the raids of the Tatar-Mongolian horde. The lane owes its name to the countertop weavers who lived on its territory, who were engaged in the production of tablecloths for the royal court.

Since the 18th century, this cozy, very uncrowded and green street began to attract representatives of the Moscow nobility. The capital's elite, after a while, almost completely “occupied” Stoleshnikov Lane. The old wooden buildings, which had been located here for many years, were moved, and in their place were erected stone chambers of representatives of the upper class of the capital's society — Princes Dolgorukov, Trubetskoy, Kozlovsky and other wealthy people.

The Patriotic War of 1812 made significant adjustments to the architectural appearance of Moscow, and Stoleshnikov Lane was also affected by the disaster. As a result of the largest fire in the centuries-old history of the Russian capital, which occurred due to the fault of French soldiers, all the wooden buildings densely huddled along the alley were destroyed. After these historic events, all the buildings in the alley were built of stone. In the second half of the 19th century, Stoleshnikov Lane began to gradually turn into shopping arcades. Over the years, many shops of various profiles and all kinds of merchant shops have been located here: rich people and their wives came from all over Moscow to get to the sale. People of lesser incomes were also in a hurry here to buy some goods that were stale on the shelves at a bargain price.

After the revolutionary events of 1917, when the Bolsheviks came to power, all shops and shops were converted into warehouses. However, when the regime of “war communism” began to decline, Stoleshnikov Lane again sparkled with shop windows.

Today, the lane is popular not only among shoppers, but this quiet place is ideal for romantic dates and leisurely walks in the historical center of Moscow.

Address

Stoleshnikov alley

Source

https://kudago.com/msk/place/stoleshnikov-pereulok/

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