Place Details

Place Details

Spassky Cathedral of Andronikov Monastery

The history of the Spassky Cathedral is connected with an ancient legend, according to which the church was built at the behest of Moscow Metropolitan Alexei. In 1357, not yet ordained, Alexei went to Tsargrad (Constantinople) to visit the Ecumenical Orthodox Patriarch for the ordination ceremony. On the way back, his ship was caught in a storm. Alexey began to pray, but the elements did not calm down until the Metropolitan swore to erect a church in Moscow in the name of the Image of the Savior Not Made by Hands. According to legend, he returned to his homeland just on the day of the church holiday of the Savior Not Made by Hands.

The cathedral was built in 1357, but in 1368 it burned down. It was rebuilt between 1390 and 1427 under Abbot Alexander, and it is in this form that it has survived to this day. Next to the church are the graves of Andronik and Savva of Moscow, who founded the monastery.

The Spassky Cathedral has one dome topped with a cross. On the walls, you can see traces of painting — elements of zoomorphic and plant compositions. It is known that famous icon painters of that time Daniil Cherny and Andrei Rublev participated in the decoration of the church, but little remained of their frescoes — only ornaments on the sides of the windows.

In 1812, the church was looted and badly damaged by a fire that engulfed Moscow. The iconostasis burned out in it, the dome collapsed, but the strong white-stone walls still survived. The restoration and modernization of the cathedral continued until 1850 under the leadership of architect Gerasimov: the roof and dome were restored and covered with iron, the walls were re-painted, a new iconostasis was installed, two side chapels and a porch have been completed. Another restoration of the Spassky Cathedral was carried out in 1959-1960, which contributed to the renovation of the building and gave it its original historical appearance.

Currently, divine services are held in the church. The monastery buildings house the Andrei Rublev Central Museum of Ancient Russian Culture and Art. The museum dedicated to the memory of the great icon painter was founded in 1947, on the anniversary of Moscow's 800th anniversary. For a long time, its funds were not very rich, but over time, the museum became a repository and center for the restoration of dilapidated icons and frescoes that were transferred here from destroyed churches in different parts of Of Russia. Today, the museum features about 5,000 icons from different eras, icon frames, ancient Orthodox cult attributes, handwritten and printed church books, including Old Believers. The museum has clubs for lovers of Old Russian art for adults and children, tours and lectures are held.

The cost of visiting the museum is 350 rubles for adults, 200 rubles for pensioners and students. Admission is free for children under 16 years of age. Tickets for temporary exhibitions are sold separately.

The history of the Spassky Cathedral is connected with an ancient legend, according to which the church was built at the behest of Moscow Metropolitan Alexei. In 1357, not yet ordained, Alexei went to Tsargrad (Constantinople) to visit the Ecumenical Orthodox Patriarch for the ordination ceremony. On the way back, his ship was caught in a storm. Alexey began to pray, but the elements did not calm down until the Metropolitan swore to erect a church in Moscow in the name of the Image of the Savior Not Made by Hands. According to legend, he returned to his homeland just on the day of the church holiday of the Savior Not Made by Hands.

The cathedral was built in 1357, but in 1368 it burned down. It was rebuilt between 1390 and 1427 under Abbot Alexander, and it is in this form that it has survived to this day. Next to the church are the graves of Andronik and Savva of Moscow, who founded the monastery.

The Spassky Cathedral has one dome topped with a cross. On the walls, you can see traces of painting — elements of zoomorphic and plant compositions. It is known that famous icon painters of that time Daniil Cherny and Andrei Rublev participated in the decoration of the church, but little remained of their frescoes — only ornaments on the sides of the windows.

In 1812, the church was looted and badly damaged by a fire that engulfed Moscow. The iconostasis burned out in it, the dome collapsed, but the strong white-stone walls still survived. The restoration and modernization of the cathedral continued until 1850 under the leadership of architect Gerasimov: the roof and dome were restored and covered with iron, the walls were re-painted, a new iconostasis was installed, two side chapels and a porch have been completed. Another restoration of the Spassky Cathedral was carried out in 1959-1960, which contributed to the renovation of the building and gave it its original historical appearance.

Currently, divine services are held in the church. The monastery buildings house the Andrei Rublev Central Museum of Ancient Russian Culture and Art. The museum dedicated to the memory of the great icon painter was founded in 1947, on the anniversary of Moscow's 800th anniversary. For a long time, its funds were not very rich, but over time, the museum became a repository and center for the restoration of dilapidated icons and frescoes that were transferred here from destroyed churches in different parts of Of Russia. Today, the museum features about 5,000 icons from different eras, icon frames, ancient Orthodox cult attributes, handwritten and printed church books, including Old Believers. The museum has clubs for lovers of Old Russian art for adults and children, tours and lectures are held.

The cost of visiting the museum is 350 rubles for adults, 200 rubles for pensioners and students. Admission is free for children under 16 years of age. Tickets for temporary exhibitions are sold separately.

The history of the Spassky Cathedral is connected with an ancient legend, according to which the church was built at the behest of Moscow Metropolitan Alexei. In 1357, not yet ordained, Alexei went to Tsargrad (Constantinople) to visit the Ecumenical Orthodox Patriarch for the ordination ceremony. On the way back, his ship was caught in a storm. Alexey began to pray, but the elements did not calm down until the Metropolitan swore to erect a church in Moscow in the name of the Image of the Savior Not Made by Hands. According to legend, he returned to his homeland just on the day of the church holiday of the Savior Not Made by Hands.

The cathedral was built in 1357, but in 1368 it burned down. It was rebuilt between 1390 and 1427 under Abbot Alexander, and it is in this form that it has survived to this day. Next to the church are the graves of Andronik and Savva of Moscow, who founded the monastery.

The Spassky Cathedral has one dome topped with a cross. On the walls, you can see traces of painting — elements of zoomorphic and plant compositions. It is known that famous icon painters of that time Daniil Cherny and Andrei Rublev participated in the decoration of the church, but little remained of their frescoes — only ornaments on the sides of the windows.

In 1812, the church was looted and badly damaged by a fire that engulfed Moscow. The iconostasis burned out in it, the dome collapsed, but the strong white-stone walls still survived. The restoration and modernization of the cathedral continued until 1850 under the leadership of architect Gerasimov: the roof and dome were restored and covered with iron, the walls were re-painted, a new iconostasis was installed, two side chapels and a porch have been completed. Another restoration of the Spassky Cathedral was carried out in 1959-1960, which contributed to the renovation of the building and gave it its original historical appearance.

Currently, divine services are held in the church. The monastery buildings house the Andrei Rublev Central Museum of Ancient Russian Culture and Art. The museum dedicated to the memory of the great icon painter was founded in 1947, on the anniversary of Moscow's 800th anniversary. For a long time, its funds were not very rich, but over time, the museum became a repository and center for the restoration of dilapidated icons and frescoes that were transferred here from destroyed churches in different parts of Of Russia. Today, the museum features about 5,000 icons from different eras, icon frames, ancient Orthodox cult attributes, handwritten and printed church books, including Old Believers. The museum has clubs for lovers of Old Russian art for adults and children, tours and lectures are held.

The cost of visiting the museum is 350 rubles for adults, 200 rubles for pensioners and students. Admission is free for children under 16 years of age. Tickets for temporary exhibitions are sold separately.

Address

pl. Andronyevskaya 10

Timetable

Mon, Tue, Thu 11:00 — 21:00, Fr—Sun 11:00 — 18:00

Website

http://www.rublev-museum.ru/

Source

https://kudago.com/msk/place/spasskij-sobor-andronikova-monastyrya/

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