Place Details

Place Details

Pyotr Tchaikovsky monument

The author of the project was Vera Mukhina, one of the first recognized women sculptors in Russia. She created a bust of the composer back in 1929, and in 1945 received a state order for the manufacture of an entire monument.

Mukhina developed two projects: one depicted Pyotr Ilyich as a conductor standing, the other depicted sitting in front of the music stand. The first project had to be abandoned, and the second one was fought for a long time. It caused criticism not only from officials, but also by famous composers, for example, Khrennikov. The sculptor sought to portray the composer at the time of work, frozen in the pose of a musician at work. However, critics found this pose too tense, and the bronze composer was compared to the conductor.

The installation of the monument was delayed, Vera Mukhina even asked Stalin for assistance several times, and before her death she wrote a letter to Molotov, asking him to believe her instinct as an artist and erect a monument Tchaikovsky, who will be worthy of Moscow.

The monument was opened in 1954. Unfortunately, Mukhina did not live to see this time, the sculpture was finished by her students.

The monument was erected in front of the [Moscow State Conservatory] (https://kudago.com/msk/place/moskovskaya-gosudarstvennaya-konservatoriya-mgk-im/). The composer's bronze sculpture stands on a red granite pedestal. Tchaikovsky is depicted sitting in an armchair in front of the music stand, in front of him lies an open music book. The sculpture is so expressive that it seems that the composer is now writing down a musical phrase with a pencil and counting its rhythm.

Not far from the monument there is a marble bench with a lattice, which depicts a bronze staff and engraved musical phrases from Tchaikovsky's most famous works.

When the monument was being restored in 2007, the sculptors discovered that a pencil had disappeared from the composer's hand, and some notes had disappeared from the bench. It turned out that there is an opinion among students of the conservatory that the details of the monument bring good luck in their studies and career success, so it is likely that they were “borrowed” by superstitious students.

The author of the project was Vera Mukhina, one of the first recognized women sculptors in Russia. She created a bust of the composer back in 1929, and in 1945 received a state order for the manufacture of an entire monument.

Mukhina developed two projects: one depicted Pyotr Ilyich as a conductor standing, the other depicted sitting in front of the music stand. The first project had to be abandoned, and the second one was fought for a long time. It caused criticism not only from officials, but also by famous composers, for example, Khrennikov. The sculptor sought to portray the composer at the time of work, frozen in the pose of a musician at work. However, critics found this pose too tense, and the bronze composer was compared to the conductor.

The installation of the monument was delayed, Vera Mukhina even asked Stalin for assistance several times, and before her death she wrote a letter to Molotov, asking him to believe her instinct as an artist and erect a monument Tchaikovsky, who will be worthy of Moscow.

The monument was opened in 1954. Unfortunately, Mukhina did not live to see this time, the sculpture was finished by her students.

The monument was erected in front of the [Moscow State Conservatory] (https://kudago.com/msk/place/moskovskaya-gosudarstvennaya-konservatoriya-mgk-im/). The composer's bronze sculpture stands on a red granite pedestal. Tchaikovsky is depicted sitting in an armchair in front of the music stand, in front of him lies an open music book. The sculpture is so expressive that it seems that the composer is now writing down a musical phrase with a pencil and counting its rhythm.

Not far from the monument there is a marble bench with a lattice, which depicts a bronze staff and engraved musical phrases from Tchaikovsky's most famous works.

When the monument was being restored in 2007, the sculptors discovered that a pencil had disappeared from the composer's hand, and some notes had disappeared from the bench. It turned out that there is an opinion among students of the conservatory that the details of the monument bring good luck in their studies and career success, so it is likely that they were “borrowed” by superstitious students.

The author of the project was Vera Mukhina, one of the first recognized women sculptors in Russia. She created a bust of the composer back in 1929, and in 1945 received a state order for the manufacture of an entire monument.

Mukhina developed two projects: one depicted Pyotr Ilyich as a conductor standing, the other depicted sitting in front of the music stand. The first project had to be abandoned, and the second one was fought for a long time. It caused criticism not only from officials, but also by famous composers, for example, Khrennikov. The sculptor sought to portray the composer at the time of work, frozen in the pose of a musician at work. However, critics found this pose too tense, and the bronze composer was compared to the conductor.

The installation of the monument was delayed, Vera Mukhina even asked Stalin for assistance several times, and before her death she wrote a letter to Molotov, asking him to believe her instinct as an artist and erect a monument Tchaikovsky, who will be worthy of Moscow.

The monument was opened in 1954. Unfortunately, Mukhina did not live to see this time, the sculpture was finished by her students.

The monument was erected in front of the [Moscow State Conservatory] (https://kudago.com/msk/place/moskovskaya-gosudarstvennaya-konservatoriya-mgk-im/). The composer's bronze sculpture stands on a red granite pedestal. Tchaikovsky is depicted sitting in an armchair in front of the music stand, in front of him lies an open music book. The sculpture is so expressive that it seems that the composer is now writing down a musical phrase with a pencil and counting its rhythm.

Not far from the monument there is a marble bench with a lattice, which depicts a bronze staff and engraved musical phrases from Tchaikovsky's most famous works.

When the monument was being restored in 2007, the sculptors discovered that a pencil had disappeared from the composer's hand, and some notes had disappeared from the bench. It turned out that there is an opinion among students of the conservatory that the details of the monument bring good luck in their studies and career success, so it is likely that they were “borrowed” by superstitious students.

Address

st. Bolshaya Nikitskaya 13

Source

https://kudago.com/msk/place/pamyatnik-petru-chajkovskomu/

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