Place Details

Place Details

Nikitsky Boulevard

Initially, the White City was located here, to which the Nikitsky Gate led, after which the boulevard was named so. On Nikitsky Boulevard, all houses were wooden, so during the famous fire in the Russo-French War of 1812, almost all of them burned down. After that, stone buildings began to be built on the boulevard, mostly inhabited by merchants and students. The famous Russian commander Suvorov also lived not far from here, in honor of whom the boulevard was renamed from Nikitsky to Suvorovsky in 1950.

There are many historical sights on Nikitsky Boulevard. Tourist excursions usually begin with a visit to the Boris and Gleb Church built in the second half of the 16th century. The next house housed the premises in which the rehearsals of the [Bolshoi] (http://kudago.com/msk/place/bolshoi/) and [Maly] (http://kudago.com/msk/place/maly/) theaters took place, as well as the director lived theaters in Moscow. In the 1820s, a literary salon also gathered here, attended by Pushkin, Krylov, Griboedov and other famous writers and poets. [Gogol] lived and died in one of the houses on Nikitsky Boulevard for a long time (http://kudago.com/msk/list/moskva-gogolya/). This is where he burned the second volume of his Dead Souls. For several years now, this building has housed the [Gogol Museum] (http://kudago.com/msk/place/dom-nikolaya-gogoly/). If you walk almost to the end of Nikitsky Boulevard, you can see a small inconspicuous church of Fedor Studit, built at the beginning of the 17th century. Alexander Suvorov was among the parishioners of this church. Opposite is a mansion that once belonged to a wealthy Muscovite P. Lunin, and today it has been placed at the disposal of the [Museum of the East] (http://kudago.com/msk/place/muzej-narodov-vostok/). There is also the Journalist's House on Nikitsky, the former palace of Princes Gagarins, and the Church of the Ascension of the Lord was erected, where services began to be held again in the 1990s.

Initially, the White City was located here, to which the Nikitsky Gate led, after which the boulevard was named so. On Nikitsky Boulevard, all houses were wooden, so during the famous fire in the Russo-French War of 1812, almost all of them burned down. After that, stone buildings began to be built on the boulevard, mostly inhabited by merchants and students. The famous Russian commander Suvorov also lived not far from here, in honor of whom the boulevard was renamed from Nikitsky to Suvorovsky in 1950.

There are many historical sights on Nikitsky Boulevard. Tourist excursions usually begin with a visit to the Boris and Gleb Church built in the second half of the 16th century. The next house housed the premises in which the rehearsals of the [Bolshoi] (http://kudago.com/msk/place/bolshoi/) and [Maly] (http://kudago.com/msk/place/maly/) theaters took place, as well as the director lived theaters in Moscow. In the 1820s, a literary salon also gathered here, attended by Pushkin, Krylov, Griboedov and other famous writers and poets. [Gogol] lived and died in one of the houses on Nikitsky Boulevard for a long time (http://kudago.com/msk/list/moskva-gogolya/). This is where he burned the second volume of his Dead Souls. For several years now, this building has housed the [Gogol Museum] (http://kudago.com/msk/place/dom-nikolaya-gogoly/). If you walk almost to the end of Nikitsky Boulevard, you can see a small inconspicuous church of Fedor Studit, built at the beginning of the 17th century. Alexander Suvorov was among the parishioners of this church. Opposite is a mansion that once belonged to a wealthy Muscovite P. Lunin, and today it has been placed at the disposal of the [Museum of the East] (http://kudago.com/msk/place/muzej-narodov-vostok/). There is also the Journalist's House on Nikitsky, the former palace of Princes Gagarins, and the Church of the Ascension of the Lord was erected, where services began to be held again in the 1990s.

Initially, the White City was located here, to which the Nikitsky Gate led, after which the boulevard was named so. On Nikitsky Boulevard, all houses were wooden, so during the famous fire in the Russo-French War of 1812, almost all of them burned down. After that, stone buildings began to be built on the boulevard, mostly inhabited by merchants and students. The famous Russian commander Suvorov also lived not far from here, in honor of whom the boulevard was renamed from Nikitsky to Suvorovsky in 1950.

There are many historical sights on Nikitsky Boulevard. Tourist excursions usually begin with a visit to the Boris and Gleb Church built in the second half of the 16th century. The next house housed the premises in which the rehearsals of the [Bolshoi] (http://kudago.com/msk/place/bolshoi/) and [Maly] (http://kudago.com/msk/place/maly/) theaters took place, as well as the director lived theaters in Moscow. In the 1820s, a literary salon also gathered here, attended by Pushkin, Krylov, Griboedov and other famous writers and poets. [Gogol] lived and died in one of the houses on Nikitsky Boulevard for a long time (http://kudago.com/msk/list/moskva-gogolya/). This is where he burned the second volume of his Dead Souls. For several years now, this building has housed the [Gogol Museum] (http://kudago.com/msk/place/dom-nikolaya-gogoly/). If you walk almost to the end of Nikitsky Boulevard, you can see a small inconspicuous church of Fedor Studit, built at the beginning of the 17th century. Alexander Suvorov was among the parishioners of this church. Opposite is a mansion that once belonged to a wealthy Muscovite P. Lunin, and today it has been placed at the disposal of the [Museum of the East] (http://kudago.com/msk/place/muzej-narodov-vostok/). There is also the Journalist's House on Nikitsky, the former palace of Princes Gagarins, and the Church of the Ascension of the Lord was erected, where services began to be held again in the 1990s.

Address

Nikitsky Boulevard

Source

https://kudago.com/msk/place/nikitskij-bulvar/

Map

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