Place Details

Place Details

Vasilchikova's estate

In 1822, Ekaterina Vasilchikova, whose family dates back to the Old Moscow nobility, bought a plot empty after the fire of 1812 and built two buildings on it: the first in the classical one, the second in Russian style. It was in this house that Vasilchikova's son Nikolai and his friend were arrested — they were close to the Decembrists and sometimes met with them in the mansion.

At the end of the 1830s, Vasilchikova sold the estate to the Zubov-Obolensky family. The buildings were rebuilt several times, and in the 1860s they were combined into one, enriching the decoration of the premises. The interiors have a beautiful grand staircase, fireplaces, tapestries, crystal chandeliers, exotic rooms.

A few years later, the mansion was bought by merchant Alexander Alekseev and moved here with his family. Under Alekseev, a two-story extension to the house was erected in the yard. By the way, the merchant was the uncle of the future famous director Stanislavsky, who also often came to the estate.

After Alekseev's death, the widow divided the mansion into two parts, selling one of them to Vladimir von Mecca, the son of a famous philanthropist and railway tycoon. Here von Meck fell ill and died a few years later. The estate was sold again, and the new owners installed electricity, heating, built a balcony and rebuilt the canopy in the yard. However, another death again caused a change of owners, and now the owner of the house is Lyubov Zimina, a representative of the merchant family. Zimina's husband was the famous opera singer Raysky, so the house was often visited by famous creative people — composers Rachmaninoff and Glazunov, singer Chaliapin.

After 1917, the mansion was nationalized, and one of the apartments was left to the owner. In Soviet times, the owners of the house also changed: the Supreme Court was located here, political emigrants lived, and after the Great Patriotic War, the building was given to a construction company.

In 2015-2016, the mansion was restored, returning it to its original interiors, including colors and decor.

Since 2019, the building has housed the Museum of Military Uniforms.

In 1822, Ekaterina Vasilchikova, whose family dates back to the Old Moscow nobility, bought a plot empty after the fire of 1812 and built two buildings on it: the first in the classical one, the second in Russian style. It was in this house that Vasilchikova's son Nikolai and his friend were arrested — they were close to the Decembrists and sometimes met with them in the mansion.

At the end of the 1830s, Vasilchikova sold the estate to the Zubov-Obolensky family. The buildings were rebuilt several times, and in the 1860s they were combined into one, enriching the decoration of the premises. The interiors have a beautiful grand staircase, fireplaces, tapestries, crystal chandeliers, exotic rooms.

A few years later, the mansion was bought by merchant Alexander Alekseev and moved here with his family. Under Alekseev, a two-story extension to the house was erected in the yard. By the way, the merchant was the uncle of the future famous director Stanislavsky, who also often came to the estate.

After Alekseev's death, the widow divided the mansion into two parts, selling one of them to Vladimir von Mecca, the son of a famous philanthropist and railway tycoon. Here von Meck fell ill and died a few years later. The estate was sold again, and the new owners installed electricity, heating, built a balcony and rebuilt the canopy in the yard. However, another death again caused a change of owners, and now the owner of the house is Lyubov Zimina, a representative of the merchant family. Zimina's husband was the famous opera singer Raysky, so the house was often visited by famous creative people — composers Rachmaninoff and Glazunov, singer Chaliapin.

After 1917, the mansion was nationalized, and one of the apartments was left to the owner. In Soviet times, the owners of the house also changed: the Supreme Court was located here, political emigrants lived, and after the Great Patriotic War, the building was given to a construction company.

In 2015-2016, the mansion was restored, returning it to its original interiors, including colors and decor.

Since 2019, the building has housed the Museum of Military Uniforms.

In 1822, Ekaterina Vasilchikova, whose family dates back to the Old Moscow nobility, bought a plot empty after the fire of 1812 and built two buildings on it: the first in the classical one, the second in Russian style. It was in this house that Vasilchikova's son Nikolai and his friend were arrested — they were close to the Decembrists and sometimes met with them in the mansion.

At the end of the 1830s, Vasilchikova sold the estate to the Zubov-Obolensky family. The buildings were rebuilt several times, and in the 1860s they were combined into one, enriching the decoration of the premises. The interiors have a beautiful grand staircase, fireplaces, tapestries, crystal chandeliers, exotic rooms.

A few years later, the mansion was bought by merchant Alexander Alekseev and moved here with his family. Under Alekseev, a two-story extension to the house was erected in the yard. By the way, the merchant was the uncle of the future famous director Stanislavsky, who also often came to the estate.

After Alekseev's death, the widow divided the mansion into two parts, selling one of them to Vladimir von Mecca, the son of a famous philanthropist and railway tycoon. Here von Meck fell ill and died a few years later. The estate was sold again, and the new owners installed electricity, heating, built a balcony and rebuilt the canopy in the yard. However, another death again caused a change of owners, and now the owner of the house is Lyubov Zimina, a representative of the merchant family. Zimina's husband was the famous opera singer Raysky, so the house was often visited by famous creative people — composers Rachmaninoff and Glazunov, singer Chaliapin.

After 1917, the mansion was nationalized, and one of the apartments was left to the owner. In Soviet times, the owners of the house also changed: the Supreme Court was located here, political emigrants lived, and after the Great Patriotic War, the building was given to a construction company.

In 2015-2016, the mansion was restored, returning it to its original interiors, including colors and decor.

Since 2019, the building has housed the Museum of Military Uniforms.

Address

st. Bolshaya Nikitskaya 46/17, bldg. 1

Source

https://kudago.com/msk/place/muzej-usadba-vasilchikovoj/

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