Place Details

Place Details

Pyotr Leonidovich Kapitsa Museum-Study

For the Nobel laureate in physics, Pyotr Leonidovich Kapitsa (1894-1984), fate gave many victories and measured out a lot of suffering - both in human and scientific terms. Thanks to the scientist's deep individuality, his fate repeated many times everything that happened in society and science in the 20th century.

His teachers were great physicists - Ioffe, Ernest Rutherford, Abram Fedorovich, he defended his doctorate at Cambridge, worked there for thirteen years, until in 1934 the Soviet government forbade him to travel abroad; Soviet colleagues envied him, wrote denunciations, and Beria considered him an enemy of the people, and if not for Stalin’s personal intercession, he would have removed him not only from science, but also from life; his father, first wife and two children died one after another from a Spanish flu in a revolutionary Petrograd; he founded institutes and departments, was a member of the Royal Society of London and was awarded the Stalin Prize, was the Hero of Socialist Labor and a Nobel laureate - the life of an academician was full of interesting events, full of achievements and discoveries.

By its decision of January 17, 1985, the Academy of Sciences decided to perpetuate the memory of the scientist - to create his museum. The professor's wife, Anna Alekseevna, decided to leave her husband's office unchanged in the room that became their home - the house is located on the territory owned by the IPP.

The museum building was built in 1950, the author of the project is architect E.N. Stamo. An elegant two-story mansion looks like an Italian villa. Initially, it was intended for laboratory research. In the lobby, the architect made an atrium on two floors, and the ceiling was painted in ultramarine color. “The Blue Sky of Armenia” (as he called his creation) to this day surprises guests with its unusual appearance.

In 1955, Petr Leonidovich returned to the post of director of the IFP, but was in no hurry to move into the apartment of his predecessor - he chose an empty one for that moment laboratory room. E.N. Stamo remade the mansion for the needs of the family: on the first floor he allocated a kitchen, an entrance hall and a living room, on the second floor he equipped a bedroom, an office for the owner, an archive, a library and a workshop room with a set of small machines - planers, drilling and turning.

After the death of the physicist, the first the floor was given over to the laboratory of the institute, and a museum was created on the second. A year after the scientist's death, the museum welcomed the first visitors - they were colleagues of the famous physicist.

The organizers tried to preserve the premises in the form they had during the lifetime of the academician. The scientist’s office remained untouched, unique instruments and details of research facilities - the scientist used them in his experiments, machine tools - he liked to work with them, photographs, personal archives, holograms of medals were created on a special showcase, which were awarded to Pyotr Leonidovich. According to the recollections of colleagues, Kapitsa did not like "digging into old papers", he penetrated the essence of things, he made equipment - new installations, instruments, test benches and mock-ups - they all contain a piece of his personal work. The museum has a watch table - repairing watches was another hobby of Kapitsa. Miniature tools and magnifying glasses are displayed prominently. Another original exhibit is a self-adjusting table, at the bottom of the tabletop there is an inscription: “The stable table of the P.L. Kapitsa. Made on Nikolina Gora from May 5 to May 19, 1948. Made by the author P. Kapitsa.

The office stores materials about the public side of the academician's life.

Visiting the museum is possible only by prior arrangement.

For the Nobel laureate in physics, Pyotr Leonidovich Kapitsa (1894-1984), fate gave many victories and measured out a lot of suffering - both in human and scientific terms. Thanks to the scientist's deep individuality, his fate repeated many times everything that happened in society and science in the 20th century.

His teachers were great physicists - Ioffe, Ernest Rutherford, Abram Fedorovich, he defended his doctorate at Cambridge, worked there for thirteen years, until in 1934 the Soviet government forbade him to travel abroad; Soviet colleagues envied him, wrote denunciations, and Beria considered him an enemy of the people, and if not for Stalin’s personal intercession, he would have removed him not only from science, but also from life; his father, first wife and two children died one after another from a Spanish flu in a revolutionary Petrograd; he founded institutes and departments, was a member of the Royal Society of London and was awarded the Stalin Prize, was the Hero of Socialist Labor and a Nobel laureate - the life of an academician was full of interesting events, full of achievements and discoveries.

By its decision of January 17, 1985, the Academy of Sciences decided to perpetuate the memory of the scientist - to create his museum. The professor's wife, Anna Alekseevna, decided to leave her husband's office unchanged in the room that became their home - the house is located on the territory owned by the IPP.

The museum building was built in 1950, the author of the project is architect E.N. Stamo. An elegant two-story mansion looks like an Italian villa. Initially, it was intended for laboratory research. In the lobby, the architect made an atrium on two floors, and the ceiling was painted in ultramarine color. “The Blue Sky of Armenia” (as he called his creation) to this day surprises guests with its unusual appearance.

In 1955, Petr Leonidovich returned to the post of director of the IFP, but was in no hurry to move into the apartment of his predecessor - he chose an empty one for that moment laboratory room. E.N. Stamo remade the mansion for the needs of the family: on the first floor he allocated a kitchen, an entrance hall and a living room, on the second floor he equipped a bedroom, an office for the owner, an archive, a library and a workshop room with a set of small machines - planers, drilling and turning.

After the death of the physicist, the first the floor was given over to the laboratory of the institute, and a museum was created on the second. A year after the scientist's death, the museum welcomed the first visitors - they were colleagues of the famous physicist.

The organizers tried to preserve the premises in the form they had during the lifetime of the academician. The scientist’s office remained untouched, unique instruments and details of research facilities - the scientist used them in his experiments, machine tools - he liked to work with them, photographs, personal archives, holograms of medals were created on a special showcase, which were awarded to Pyotr Leonidovich. According to the recollections of colleagues, Kapitsa did not like "digging into old papers", he penetrated the essence of things, he made equipment - new installations, instruments, test benches and mock-ups - they all contain a piece of his personal work. The museum has a watch table - repairing watches was another hobby of Kapitsa. Miniature tools and magnifying glasses are displayed prominently. Another original exhibit is a self-adjusting table, at the bottom of the tabletop there is an inscription: “The stable table of the P.L. Kapitsa. Made on Nikolina Gora from May 5 to May 19, 1948. Made by the author P. Kapitsa.

The office stores materials about the public side of the academician's life.

Visiting the museum is possible only by prior arrangement.

For the Nobel laureate in physics, Pyotr Leonidovich Kapitsa (1894-1984), fate gave many victories and measured out a lot of suffering - both in human and scientific terms. Thanks to the scientist's deep individuality, his fate repeated many times everything that happened in society and science in the 20th century.

His teachers were great physicists - Ioffe, Ernest Rutherford, Abram Fedorovich, he defended his doctorate at Cambridge, worked there for thirteen years, until in 1934 the Soviet government forbade him to travel abroad; Soviet colleagues envied him, wrote denunciations, and Beria considered him an enemy of the people, and if not for Stalin’s personal intercession, he would have removed him not only from science, but also from life; his father, first wife and two children died one after another from a Spanish flu in a revolutionary Petrograd; he founded institutes and departments, was a member of the Royal Society of London and was awarded the Stalin Prize, was the Hero of Socialist Labor and a Nobel laureate - the life of an academician was full of interesting events, full of achievements and discoveries.

By its decision of January 17, 1985, the Academy of Sciences decided to perpetuate the memory of the scientist - to create his museum. The professor's wife, Anna Alekseevna, decided to leave her husband's office unchanged in the room that became their home - the house is located on the territory owned by the IPP.

The museum building was built in 1950, the author of the project is architect E.N. Stamo. An elegant two-story mansion looks like an Italian villa. Initially, it was intended for laboratory research. In the lobby, the architect made an atrium on two floors, and the ceiling was painted in ultramarine color. “The Blue Sky of Armenia” (as he called his creation) to this day surprises guests with its unusual appearance.

In 1955, Petr Leonidovich returned to the post of director of the IFP, but was in no hurry to move into the apartment of his predecessor - he chose an empty one for that moment laboratory room. E.N. Stamo remade the mansion for the needs of the family: on the first floor he allocated a kitchen, an entrance hall and a living room, on the second floor he equipped a bedroom, an office for the owner, an archive, a library and a workshop room with a set of small machines - planers, drilling and turning.

After the death of the physicist, the first the floor was given over to the laboratory of the institute, and a museum was created on the second. A year after the scientist's death, the museum welcomed the first visitors - they were colleagues of the famous physicist.

The organizers tried to preserve the premises in the form they had during the lifetime of the academician. The scientist’s office remained untouched, unique instruments and details of research facilities - the scientist used them in his experiments, machine tools - he liked to work with them, photographs, personal archives, holograms of medals were created on a special showcase, which were awarded to Pyotr Leonidovich. According to the recollections of colleagues, Kapitsa did not like "digging into old papers", he penetrated the essence of things, he made equipment - new installations, instruments, test benches and mock-ups - they all contain a piece of his personal work. The museum has a watch table - repairing watches was another hobby of Kapitsa. Miniature tools and magnifying glasses are displayed prominently. Another original exhibit is a self-adjusting table, at the bottom of the tabletop there is an inscription: “The stable table of the P.L. Kapitsa. Made on Nikolina Gora from May 5 to May 19, 1948. Made by the author P. Kapitsa.

The office stores materials about the public side of the academician's life.

Visiting the museum is possible only by prior arrangement.

Address

st. Kosygin, d.2

Timetable

Mon-Fri 10:00am — 6:00pm; visits to the museum are possible only by prior arrangement

Phone

+7 499 137-32-30

Website

http://kapitza.ras.ru/museum

Source

https://kudago.com/msk/place/muzej-kabinet-petra-leonidovicha-kapicy/

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