Place Details

Place Details

Tsvetnoy Boulevard

Previously, the Neglinnaya River flowed on this place, which is now impossible to find while walking around the capital. The thing is that in 1819, the river was shackled in an underground pipe, and a boulevard appeared in its place. Previously, Neglinnaya's fate was reminded of its name — [Trubny] (https://kudago.com/msk/place/trubnaya-ploshad-v-moskve/), but later the boulevard was renamed in honor of the already mentioned market.

Surprisingly, by the end of the century before last, a street with such a romantic name had gained notoriety among citizens as a place where various asocial elements gather. The thing is that Tsvetnoy was chosen by the owners of drinking establishments, and more of them opened here than anywhere else in Moscow.

Before the Great Patriotic War, trams ran along Tsvetnoy Boulevard. The rails were removed in 1947 after a major overhaul of the highway. The street was also restored in the 21st century: the boulevard was landscaped, a fountain was installed, but a large number of trees were cut down.

In 1880, the famous [Moscow Circus] (https://kudago.com/msk/place/cirk-nikulina/) opened in house number 13, whose director from 1982 until the end of his life was Yuri Nikulin. In memory of the actor, a monument was unveiled on Tsvetnoy in 2000: bronze Nikulin is standing near the car that appeared in the film “The Caucasian Captive” (the car belonged to the actor).

In 2002, the Clowns fountain by Zurab Tsereteli appeared on Tsvetnoy. It was installed across the street from the entrance to the circus. Water jets hit in the bronze bowl, and in the center there is a clown on a unicycle under an umbrella. The artist is in a hurry, and another clown falls out of his suitcase. Other clowns jump over each other next to each other, and their “colleagues” look at them from both sides.

Previously, the Neglinnaya River flowed on this place, which is now impossible to find while walking around the capital. The thing is that in 1819, the river was shackled in an underground pipe, and a boulevard appeared in its place. Previously, Neglinnaya's fate was reminded of its name — [Trubny] (https://kudago.com/msk/place/trubnaya-ploshad-v-moskve/), but later the boulevard was renamed in honor of the already mentioned market.

Surprisingly, by the end of the century before last, a street with such a romantic name had gained notoriety among citizens as a place where various asocial elements gather. The thing is that Tsvetnoy was chosen by the owners of drinking establishments, and more of them opened here than anywhere else in Moscow.

Before the Great Patriotic War, trams ran along Tsvetnoy Boulevard. The rails were removed in 1947 after a major overhaul of the highway. The street was also restored in the 21st century: the boulevard was landscaped, a fountain was installed, but a large number of trees were cut down.

In 1880, the famous [Moscow Circus] (https://kudago.com/msk/place/cirk-nikulina/) opened in house number 13, whose director from 1982 until the end of his life was Yuri Nikulin. In memory of the actor, a monument was unveiled on Tsvetnoy in 2000: bronze Nikulin is standing near the car that appeared in the film “The Caucasian Captive” (the car belonged to the actor).

In 2002, the Clowns fountain by Zurab Tsereteli appeared on Tsvetnoy. It was installed across the street from the entrance to the circus. Water jets hit in the bronze bowl, and in the center there is a clown on a unicycle under an umbrella. The artist is in a hurry, and another clown falls out of his suitcase. Other clowns jump over each other next to each other, and their “colleagues” look at them from both sides.

Previously, the Neglinnaya River flowed on this place, which is now impossible to find while walking around the capital. The thing is that in 1819, the river was shackled in an underground pipe, and a boulevard appeared in its place. Previously, Neglinnaya's fate was reminded of its name — [Trubny] (https://kudago.com/msk/place/trubnaya-ploshad-v-moskve/), but later the boulevard was renamed in honor of the already mentioned market.

Surprisingly, by the end of the century before last, a street with such a romantic name had gained notoriety among citizens as a place where various asocial elements gather. The thing is that Tsvetnoy was chosen by the owners of drinking establishments, and more of them opened here than anywhere else in Moscow.

Before the Great Patriotic War, trams ran along Tsvetnoy Boulevard. The rails were removed in 1947 after a major overhaul of the highway. The street was also restored in the 21st century: the boulevard was landscaped, a fountain was installed, but a large number of trees were cut down.

In 1880, the famous [Moscow Circus] (https://kudago.com/msk/place/cirk-nikulina/) opened in house number 13, whose director from 1982 until the end of his life was Yuri Nikulin. In memory of the actor, a monument was unveiled on Tsvetnoy in 2000: bronze Nikulin is standing near the car that appeared in the film “The Caucasian Captive” (the car belonged to the actor).

In 2002, the Clowns fountain by Zurab Tsereteli appeared on Tsvetnoy. It was installed across the street from the entrance to the circus. Water jets hit in the bronze bowl, and in the center there is a clown on a unicycle under an umbrella. The artist is in a hurry, and another clown falls out of his suitcase. Other clowns jump over each other next to each other, and their “colleagues” look at them from both sides.

Address

Blvd. Colored

Source

https://kudago.com/msk/place/cvetnoj-bulvar/

Map

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