Détails de l'emplacement

Détails de l'emplacement

Invisible Man Monument

Perhaps the proximity to the psychiatric hospital made this place even more mysterious, as some local patients claim to see a man proudly spreading his shoulders among the foliage.

In fact, it used to be a monument to Alexander II, who took the patronage of the hospital — at that time it was common practice. The Tsar was depicted in a ceremonial uniform with a ribbon, St. George's Cross and all awards on his chest.

During the revolution, the monument was overthrown from the pedestal and thrown into the river. It is said that in the 1930s the place of the figure of the emperor was replaced by a bust of Vladimir Lenin, but then he was lost somewhere. And the pedestal itself remained. Now wits often write the famous hero's name on it: “The Invisible Man.” H.G. Wells would be happy!

In 2020, the Invisible Man monument became a monument to Nobody. The St. Petersburg artist painted on an empty one (or not?) pedestal the inscription “Nobody”. The public utilities erased the inscription, but it appeared again with the number “Nobody I”. Then there was None II, None III and None IV (inscriptions appeared when utilities painted over previous ones). The artist was even approached by the alleged author of the signature “The Invisible Man”, saying that the girl is destroying the newest mythology of St. Petersburg. As a result, Nobody died — as the artist announced on the pedestal.

Perhaps the proximity to the psychiatric hospital made this place even more mysterious, as some local patients claim to see a man proudly spreading his shoulders among the foliage.

In fact, it used to be a monument to Alexander II, who took the patronage of the hospital — at that time it was common practice. The Tsar was depicted in a ceremonial uniform with a ribbon, St. George's Cross and all awards on his chest.

During the revolution, the monument was overthrown from the pedestal and thrown into the river. It is said that in the 1930s the place of the figure of the emperor was replaced by a bust of Vladimir Lenin, but then he was lost somewhere. And the pedestal itself remained. Now wits often write the famous hero's name on it: “The Invisible Man.” H.G. Wells would be happy!

In 2020, the Invisible Man monument became a monument to Nobody. The St. Petersburg artist painted on an empty one (or not?) pedestal the inscription “Nobody”. The public utilities erased the inscription, but it appeared again with the number “Nobody I”. Then there was None II, None III and None IV (inscriptions appeared when utilities painted over previous ones). The artist was even approached by the alleged author of the signature “The Invisible Man”, saying that the girl is destroying the newest mythology of St. Petersburg. As a result, Nobody died — as the artist announced on the pedestal.

Perhaps the proximity to the psychiatric hospital made this place even more mysterious, as some local patients claim to see a man proudly spreading his shoulders among the foliage.

In fact, it used to be a monument to Alexander II, who took the patronage of the hospital — at that time it was common practice. The Tsar was depicted in a ceremonial uniform with a ribbon, St. George's Cross and all awards on his chest.

During the revolution, the monument was overthrown from the pedestal and thrown into the river. It is said that in the 1930s the place of the figure of the emperor was replaced by a bust of Vladimir Lenin, but then he was lost somewhere. And the pedestal itself remained. Now wits often write the famous hero's name on it: “The Invisible Man.” H.G. Wells would be happy!

In 2020, the Invisible Man monument became a monument to Nobody. The St. Petersburg artist painted on an empty one (or not?) pedestal the inscription “Nobody”. The public utilities erased the inscription, but it appeared again with the number “Nobody I”. Then there was None II, None III and None IV (inscriptions appeared when utilities painted over previous ones). The artist was even approached by the alleged author of the signature “The Invisible Man”, saying that the girl is destroying the newest mythology of St. Petersburg. As a result, Nobody died — as the artist announced on the pedestal.

Adresse

emb. Fontanka 132

Source

https://kudago.com/spb/place/pamyatnik-nevidimke/

Carte

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Visites de ville