Détails de l'emplacement

Détails de l'emplacement

Khrapovitsky bridge

Khrapovitsky Bridge is one of the small neat bridges in St. Petersburg. It is 43.4 meters long and 20 meters wide. The building is located near [New Holland Island] (https://kudago.com/spb/place/art-prostranstvo-novaya-gollandiya2/) and runs along the axis of Pisarev Street, connecting it with the embankment of the Admiralty Canal.

The first bridge in this place appeared in 1737. It was a multi-span wooden crossing equipped with a drawspan, and was called Yellow. In 1753, the bridge received a new name: at that time it was called Galerny or Korabelny, since the Galernaya Shipyard was located nearby. A little less than 50 years later, the bridge was renamed again: in the plan of St. Petersburg for 1798, it is listed as the Sinyavin Bridge. A few years later, the building acquires its modern name — Khrapovitsky.

For several centuries, not only the name of the bridge, but also its appearance have changed. It has been rebuilt several times. The last major reconstruction of the structure was carried out in 1935, and in 1965-1967 the bridge was rebuilt. The workers were guided by the projects of engineer E. A. Boltunova and architect L. L. Noskov, then the building acquired a modern look.

Khrapovitsky Bridge is reflected in art — it can be seen in Yuri Belov's painting “The Moika River. Khrapovitsky Bridge” (1994). In addition, the building is mentioned by A. S. Griboyedov in “Particulary Cases of the Petersburg Flood”.

Khrapovitsky Bridge is one of the small neat bridges in St. Petersburg. It is 43.4 meters long and 20 meters wide. The building is located near [New Holland Island] (https://kudago.com/spb/place/art-prostranstvo-novaya-gollandiya2/) and runs along the axis of Pisarev Street, connecting it with the embankment of the Admiralty Canal.

The first bridge in this place appeared in 1737. It was a multi-span wooden crossing equipped with a drawspan, and was called Yellow. In 1753, the bridge received a new name: at that time it was called Galerny or Korabelny, since the Galernaya Shipyard was located nearby. A little less than 50 years later, the bridge was renamed again: in the plan of St. Petersburg for 1798, it is listed as the Sinyavin Bridge. A few years later, the building acquires its modern name — Khrapovitsky.

For several centuries, not only the name of the bridge, but also its appearance have changed. It has been rebuilt several times. The last major reconstruction of the structure was carried out in 1935, and in 1965-1967 the bridge was rebuilt. The workers were guided by the projects of engineer E. A. Boltunova and architect L. L. Noskov, then the building acquired a modern look.

Khrapovitsky Bridge is reflected in art — it can be seen in Yuri Belov's painting “The Moika River. Khrapovitsky Bridge” (1994). In addition, the building is mentioned by A. S. Griboyedov in “Particulary Cases of the Petersburg Flood”.

Khrapovitsky Bridge is one of the small neat bridges in St. Petersburg. It is 43.4 meters long and 20 meters wide. The building is located near [New Holland Island] (https://kudago.com/spb/place/art-prostranstvo-novaya-gollandiya2/) and runs along the axis of Pisarev Street, connecting it with the embankment of the Admiralty Canal.

The first bridge in this place appeared in 1737. It was a multi-span wooden crossing equipped with a drawspan, and was called Yellow. In 1753, the bridge received a new name: at that time it was called Galerny or Korabelny, since the Galernaya Shipyard was located nearby. A little less than 50 years later, the bridge was renamed again: in the plan of St. Petersburg for 1798, it is listed as the Sinyavin Bridge. A few years later, the building acquires its modern name — Khrapovitsky.

For several centuries, not only the name of the bridge, but also its appearance have changed. It has been rebuilt several times. The last major reconstruction of the structure was carried out in 1935, and in 1965-1967 the bridge was rebuilt. The workers were guided by the projects of engineer E. A. Boltunova and architect L. L. Noskov, then the building acquired a modern look.

Khrapovitsky Bridge is reflected in art — it can be seen in Yuri Belov's painting “The Moika River. Khrapovitsky Bridge” (1994). In addition, the building is mentioned by A. S. Griboyedov in “Particulary Cases of the Petersburg Flood”.

Adresse

river embankment. Moika Street, 114-118

Source

https://kudago.com/spb/place/muzej-elektrotransporta/

Carte

Visites de ville