Détails de l'emplacement

Détails de l'emplacement

Regal lattice in January 9 Park

In 1924, a magnificent lattice appeared around the January 9 Park, which literally catches the eye. It was designed by the famous Art Nouveau architect Robert Meltzer and even won gold medals at an international exhibition in Paris. Almost two decades, from 1902 to 1917, it served as a fence for the garden near the Winter Palace. During the revolution, it was knocked down and mutilated. In 1920, the first socialist clean-up took place, the participants of which finally dismantled the fence and broke the symbols of autocracy from it — the monogram of Nicholas II. As such, it has been lying on Dvortsovaya Embankment for 4 years.

After the restoration, it was decided to move the Meltzer fence to the Park named after January 9. The missing links were gradually cast, and today the fence looks almost complete. At the same time, only the first three lattices have their original appearance — they were reinserted with the imperial monograms. This fence also differs from the original by the height of the base: it is much lower than the Winter Palace, and therefore looks less pompous and majestic.

In 1924, a magnificent lattice appeared around the January 9 Park, which literally catches the eye. It was designed by the famous Art Nouveau architect Robert Meltzer and even won gold medals at an international exhibition in Paris. Almost two decades, from 1902 to 1917, it served as a fence for the garden near the Winter Palace. During the revolution, it was knocked down and mutilated. In 1920, the first socialist clean-up took place, the participants of which finally dismantled the fence and broke the symbols of autocracy from it — the monogram of Nicholas II. As such, it has been lying on Dvortsovaya Embankment for 4 years.

After the restoration, it was decided to move the Meltzer fence to the Park named after January 9. The missing links were gradually cast, and today the fence looks almost complete. At the same time, only the first three lattices have their original appearance — they were reinserted with the imperial monograms. This fence also differs from the original by the height of the base: it is much lower than the Winter Palace, and therefore looks less pompous and majestic.

In 1924, a magnificent lattice appeared around the January 9 Park, which literally catches the eye. It was designed by the famous Art Nouveau architect Robert Meltzer and even won gold medals at an international exhibition in Paris. Almost two decades, from 1902 to 1917, it served as a fence for the garden near the Winter Palace. During the revolution, it was knocked down and mutilated. In 1920, the first socialist clean-up took place, the participants of which finally dismantled the fence and broke the symbols of autocracy from it — the monogram of Nicholas II. As such, it has been lying on Dvortsovaya Embankment for 4 years.

After the restoration, it was decided to move the Meltzer fence to the Park named after January 9. The missing links were gradually cast, and today the fence looks almost complete. At the same time, only the first three lattices have their original appearance — they were reinserted with the imperial monograms. This fence also differs from the original by the height of the base: it is much lower than the Winter Palace, and therefore looks less pompous and majestic.

Adresse

Garden January 9, prosp. Stachek, d.20

Source

https://kudago.com/spb/place/carstvennaya2-reshetka/

Carte

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