Détails de l'emplacement

Détails de l'emplacement

Keibel's house

By definition, eclecticism in architecture is a harmonious combination of many architectural forms in the construction of a building. In other words, the architectural ensemble, which was built, for example, in both Baroque and Gothic styles, can be considered eclectic.

The wealthy residents of St. Petersburg at the end of the 19th century immediately liked the eclectic architectural style that came to Russia from Europe. Representatives of the Russian elite, who have a fabulous state, were ready to go to various delights for the sake of satisfying their ego. Some were not averse to decorating their chic mansion with a neo-Gothic tower, while others preferred to own a couple of sculptures in the form of griffins, lion heads or sphinxes - sculptural solutions, traditional Empire style.

So, one of such rich people was Albert Yulievich Keibel, a very outstanding and interesting person, an honorary citizen of Northern Palmyra, a merchant of the first guild and a jewelry master.

Keibel's apartment building, located at the intersection of Bolshaya Zelenina and Barochnaya Streets, is a classic example of Russian eclecticism. This building, whose architecture combines many elements of various styles, seems to have come from the pages of one of the Brothers Grimm fairy tales. But the main attraction of the house in which the jeweler's family once lived is, of course, the famous bay window tower, called the Rapunzel Tower by the townspeople.

If we recall the plot of a fairy tale written by the famous researchers of German folklore brothers Grimm, it is quite possible to assume that it was in such a tower that her main character was imprisoned — a girl named Rapunzel. At least, those residents of St. Petersburg or visitors to the city who are near the house of jeweler Keibel, looking at the fabulous tower, may think so. And remember the words from the fairy tale: “Rapunzel, Rupunzel, wake up! Get your scythe down!”

By definition, eclecticism in architecture is a harmonious combination of many architectural forms in the construction of a building. In other words, the architectural ensemble, which was built, for example, in both Baroque and Gothic styles, can be considered eclectic.

The wealthy residents of St. Petersburg at the end of the 19th century immediately liked the eclectic architectural style that came to Russia from Europe. Representatives of the Russian elite, who have a fabulous state, were ready to go to various delights for the sake of satisfying their ego. Some were not averse to decorating their chic mansion with a neo-Gothic tower, while others preferred to own a couple of sculptures in the form of griffins, lion heads or sphinxes - sculptural solutions, traditional Empire style.

So, one of such rich people was Albert Yulievich Keibel, a very outstanding and interesting person, an honorary citizen of Northern Palmyra, a merchant of the first guild and a jewelry master.

Keibel's apartment building, located at the intersection of Bolshaya Zelenina and Barochnaya Streets, is a classic example of Russian eclecticism. This building, whose architecture combines many elements of various styles, seems to have come from the pages of one of the Brothers Grimm fairy tales. But the main attraction of the house in which the jeweler's family once lived is, of course, the famous bay window tower, called the Rapunzel Tower by the townspeople.

If we recall the plot of a fairy tale written by the famous researchers of German folklore brothers Grimm, it is quite possible to assume that it was in such a tower that her main character was imprisoned — a girl named Rapunzel. At least, those residents of St. Petersburg or visitors to the city who are near the house of jeweler Keibel, looking at the fabulous tower, may think so. And remember the words from the fairy tale: “Rapunzel, Rupunzel, wake up! Get your scythe down!”

By definition, eclecticism in architecture is a harmonious combination of many architectural forms in the construction of a building. In other words, the architectural ensemble, which was built, for example, in both Baroque and Gothic styles, can be considered eclectic.

The wealthy residents of St. Petersburg at the end of the 19th century immediately liked the eclectic architectural style that came to Russia from Europe. Representatives of the Russian elite, who have a fabulous state, were ready to go to various delights for the sake of satisfying their ego. Some were not averse to decorating their chic mansion with a neo-Gothic tower, while others preferred to own a couple of sculptures in the form of griffins, lion heads or sphinxes - sculptural solutions, traditional Empire style.

So, one of such rich people was Albert Yulievich Keibel, a very outstanding and interesting person, an honorary citizen of Northern Palmyra, a merchant of the first guild and a jewelry master.

Keibel's apartment building, located at the intersection of Bolshaya Zelenina and Barochnaya Streets, is a classic example of Russian eclecticism. This building, whose architecture combines many elements of various styles, seems to have come from the pages of one of the Brothers Grimm fairy tales. But the main attraction of the house in which the jeweler's family once lived is, of course, the famous bay window tower, called the Rapunzel Tower by the townspeople.

If we recall the plot of a fairy tale written by the famous researchers of German folklore brothers Grimm, it is quite possible to assume that it was in such a tower that her main character was imprisoned — a girl named Rapunzel. At least, those residents of St. Petersburg or visitors to the city who are near the house of jeweler Keibel, looking at the fabulous tower, may think so. And remember the words from the fairy tale: “Rapunzel, Rupunzel, wake up! Get your scythe down!”

Adresse

st. Bolshaya Zelenina 33

Source

https://kudago.com/spb/place/bashnya-rapuncel/

Carte

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