Détails de l'endroit

Détails de l'endroit

Shibaev manor

At the end of the 18th century, Marfa Krotkova, a widow famous for her generous charity, lived here. Temples and monasteries constantly accepted donations from her. An interesting story is associated with her name: when her husband died, Marfa Yakovlevna became very afraid to live alone in a big house. And then she did an amazing thing: she came to the police station, demanded that a policeman's post be placed under her windows, and thus arranged for herself to choose her future husband. When one of the servicemen took office, she married him. Krotkova had one strange habit: she loved to feed guests porridge. Yes, what - she put at least seven different varieties on the table. And she distributed it like this: if someone got little porridge, he was out of favor with her. And until you eat all the different porridges, don't get up from the table.

In 1870, the estate went to Shibayev, a merchant and oil producer, Old Believer, who began working together with the Morozovs at a textile factory, and then bought part of the Baku oil fields, became interested in oil and started trading it. As an Old Believer, Shibaev received a cash loan, expanded the business to build and launch an oil refinery, and then switched to sulfuric acid. Later, he began to produce mineral oils and other chemical products.

After the death of the merchant, his wife became the head of the family company, who continued to build new factories. After her death, the case was run by her sons, but in the end it was sold to oil producers from Holland.

Under Shibaev, the house was decorated in a pseudo-Russian style. The pilasters were removed and replaced with half-columns. The decor was made of terracotta, which was painted in different colors. It was this decoration that made the building stand out from the rest.

After the death of Shibayev's widow, the house was bought by the state, and a hospital was opened here. In Soviet times, the house was used for administrative purposes, and then closed for restoration. The work continues now. If before it was difficult to take your eyes off the elegant building, now it is just magnificent, as if a house from a fairy tale that arose from nowhere in the bustle of the city.

At the end of the 18th century, Marfa Krotkova, a widow famous for her generous charity, lived here. Temples and monasteries constantly accepted donations from her. An interesting story is associated with her name: when her husband died, Marfa Yakovlevna became very afraid to live alone in a big house. And then she did an amazing thing: she came to the police station, demanded that a policeman's post be placed under her windows, and thus arranged for herself to choose her future husband. When one of the servicemen took office, she married him. Krotkova had one strange habit: she loved to feed guests porridge. Yes, what - she put at least seven different varieties on the table. And she distributed it like this: if someone got little porridge, he was out of favor with her. And until you eat all the different porridges, don't get up from the table.

In 1870, the estate went to Shibayev, a merchant and oil producer, Old Believer, who began working together with the Morozovs at a textile factory, and then bought part of the Baku oil fields, became interested in oil and started trading it. As an Old Believer, Shibaev received a cash loan, expanded the business to build and launch an oil refinery, and then switched to sulfuric acid. Later, he began to produce mineral oils and other chemical products.

After the death of the merchant, his wife became the head of the family company, who continued to build new factories. After her death, the case was run by her sons, but in the end it was sold to oil producers from Holland.

Under Shibaev, the house was decorated in a pseudo-Russian style. The pilasters were removed and replaced with half-columns. The decor was made of terracotta, which was painted in different colors. It was this decoration that made the building stand out from the rest.

After the death of Shibayev's widow, the house was bought by the state, and a hospital was opened here. In Soviet times, the house was used for administrative purposes, and then closed for restoration. The work continues now. If before it was difficult to take your eyes off the elegant building, now it is just magnificent, as if a house from a fairy tale that arose from nowhere in the bustle of the city.

At the end of the 18th century, Marfa Krotkova, a widow famous for her generous charity, lived here. Temples and monasteries constantly accepted donations from her. An interesting story is associated with her name: when her husband died, Marfa Yakovlevna became very afraid to live alone in a big house. And then she did an amazing thing: she came to the police station, demanded that a policeman's post be placed under her windows, and thus arranged for herself to choose her future husband. When one of the servicemen took office, she married him. Krotkova had one strange habit: she loved to feed guests porridge. Yes, what - she put at least seven different varieties on the table. And she distributed it like this: if someone got little porridge, he was out of favor with her. And until you eat all the different porridges, don't get up from the table.

In 1870, the estate went to Shibayev, a merchant and oil producer, Old Believer, who began working together with the Morozovs at a textile factory, and then bought part of the Baku oil fields, became interested in oil and started trading it. As an Old Believer, Shibaev received a cash loan, expanded the business to build and launch an oil refinery, and then switched to sulfuric acid. Later, he began to produce mineral oils and other chemical products.

After the death of the merchant, his wife became the head of the family company, who continued to build new factories. After her death, the case was run by her sons, but in the end it was sold to oil producers from Holland.

Under Shibaev, the house was decorated in a pseudo-Russian style. The pilasters were removed and replaced with half-columns. The decor was made of terracotta, which was painted in different colors. It was this decoration that made the building stand out from the rest.

After the death of Shibayev's widow, the house was bought by the state, and a hospital was opened here. In Soviet times, the house was used for administrative purposes, and then closed for restoration. The work continues now. If before it was difficult to take your eyes off the elegant building, now it is just magnificent, as if a house from a fairy tale that arose from nowhere in the bustle of the city.

Adresse

st. Novaya Basmannaya, d.23a

La Source

https://kudago.com/msk/place/usadba-shibaevyh/

Carte

Visites de la ville