Détails de l'endroit

Détails de l'endroit

Pogodinskaya ulitsa

This street appeared in the early 1890s on the outskirts of Devichy Pole, transferred to the use of [Moscow University] (http://kudago.com/msk/place/mgu/). On this site, it was planned to build a medical town, and earlier this land belonged to the possessions of the Novodevichy Convent.

Many houses of historical value are located on Pogodinskaya Street. Thus, architect A. Weber created a project to build a Russian-style house decorated with columns and a porch in the form of a tent. Initially, the Control Chamber was supposed to be located here. During the Soviet Union, the building was one of the buildings of the 2nd Moscow State University, and today it houses the diagnostic center of the N.N. Herzen. In front of the building there is a public garden, in which there is a monument to N. F. Gamaleya, a well-known microbiologist who studied pathogens of cholera and plague.

A little further away is the estate of Princes Shcherbatov, which has a rich history. This estate is mentioned in Leo Tolstoy's novel War and Peace, and at the beginning of the 19th century this house was often visited by the Decembrists. In the 1830s, the estate was purchased by the historian M. Pogodin, undeservedly forgotten in Soviet times. In fact, he was not only engaged in historical research, but was also closely acquainted with many famous figures of literature and science, such as Pushkin and Gogol. Pogodin's estate was divided into two parts, one of which housed residential and outbuildings, and on the right there was a shady garden with a pond. The wing, built next to the central building, housed a boarding house that housed about ten students. In his house, Pogodin kept a rich historical collection of items of ancient Russian everyday life — the “Ancient Repository”: manuscripts, coins, Old Russian books, autographs and letters from personalities who left a significant mark in the history of Russia.

Today, only the “Pogodinskaya hut” reminds of the famous estate - the only surviving part of the buildings made of wood and stylized as a Russian hut.

This street appeared in the early 1890s on the outskirts of Devichy Pole, transferred to the use of [Moscow University] (http://kudago.com/msk/place/mgu/). On this site, it was planned to build a medical town, and earlier this land belonged to the possessions of the Novodevichy Convent.

Many houses of historical value are located on Pogodinskaya Street. Thus, architect A. Weber created a project to build a Russian-style house decorated with columns and a porch in the form of a tent. Initially, the Control Chamber was supposed to be located here. During the Soviet Union, the building was one of the buildings of the 2nd Moscow State University, and today it houses the diagnostic center of the N.N. Herzen. In front of the building there is a public garden, in which there is a monument to N. F. Gamaleya, a well-known microbiologist who studied pathogens of cholera and plague.

A little further away is the estate of Princes Shcherbatov, which has a rich history. This estate is mentioned in Leo Tolstoy's novel War and Peace, and at the beginning of the 19th century this house was often visited by the Decembrists. In the 1830s, the estate was purchased by the historian M. Pogodin, undeservedly forgotten in Soviet times. In fact, he was not only engaged in historical research, but was also closely acquainted with many famous figures of literature and science, such as Pushkin and Gogol. Pogodin's estate was divided into two parts, one of which housed residential and outbuildings, and on the right there was a shady garden with a pond. The wing, built next to the central building, housed a boarding house that housed about ten students. In his house, Pogodin kept a rich historical collection of items of ancient Russian everyday life — the “Ancient Repository”: manuscripts, coins, Old Russian books, autographs and letters from personalities who left a significant mark in the history of Russia.

Today, only the “Pogodinskaya hut” reminds of the famous estate - the only surviving part of the buildings made of wood and stylized as a Russian hut.

This street appeared in the early 1890s on the outskirts of Devichy Pole, transferred to the use of [Moscow University] (http://kudago.com/msk/place/mgu/). On this site, it was planned to build a medical town, and earlier this land belonged to the possessions of the Novodevichy Convent.

Many houses of historical value are located on Pogodinskaya Street. Thus, architect A. Weber created a project to build a Russian-style house decorated with columns and a porch in the form of a tent. Initially, the Control Chamber was supposed to be located here. During the Soviet Union, the building was one of the buildings of the 2nd Moscow State University, and today it houses the diagnostic center of the N.N. Herzen. In front of the building there is a public garden, in which there is a monument to N. F. Gamaleya, a well-known microbiologist who studied pathogens of cholera and plague.

A little further away is the estate of Princes Shcherbatov, which has a rich history. This estate is mentioned in Leo Tolstoy's novel War and Peace, and at the beginning of the 19th century this house was often visited by the Decembrists. In the 1830s, the estate was purchased by the historian M. Pogodin, undeservedly forgotten in Soviet times. In fact, he was not only engaged in historical research, but was also closely acquainted with many famous figures of literature and science, such as Pushkin and Gogol. Pogodin's estate was divided into two parts, one of which housed residential and outbuildings, and on the right there was a shady garden with a pond. The wing, built next to the central building, housed a boarding house that housed about ten students. In his house, Pogodin kept a rich historical collection of items of ancient Russian everyday life — the “Ancient Repository”: manuscripts, coins, Old Russian books, autographs and letters from personalities who left a significant mark in the history of Russia.

Today, only the “Pogodinskaya hut” reminds of the famous estate - the only surviving part of the buildings made of wood and stylized as a Russian hut.

Adresse

st. Pogodinskaya

La Source

https://kudago.com/msk/place/pogodinskaya-ulica/

Carte

Visites de la ville