Détails de l'endroit

Détails de l'endroit

Tea house on Myasnitskaya

Sergey Perlov is a man who began to instill a tea drinking culture in Muscovites more than 100 years ago. He was one of the first in the capital to sell this overseas drink. At that time, no one knew that in just 50 years tea would become an integral part of the life of every Russian.

In 1875, Sergey Perlov, a representative of the eminent merchant dynasty, bought a plot for the construction of a store. He invited the famous architect of the capital Roman Klein, who by that time had developed many well-known projects — Borodinsky Bridge, the Muir and Merliz store (now TSUM) and much more. On the ruins of the old building, Klein erected a three-story residential building in the style of the late Renaissance.

In 1895, the merchant decided to diversify the facade in such a way as to indicate his ties with Chinese tea merchants. In addition, the capital's merchants were waiting for the arrival of the influential Qing dignitary Li Hongzhang. Perlov expected to impress the eminent guest, so he entrusted the project for the reconstruction of the building to the master of decorative arts Karl Gippius. The result exceeded all his expectations, and the Tea House was transformed beyond recognition. Chinese dragons, snakes, ornaments — every detail just shouted about the East. All materials were purchased in China and were used not only for exterior decoration, but also for the interior of the store. One of the key elements was the traditional pagoda tower. Despite the fact that an important dignitary ignored Perlov's efforts, Muscovites forever fell in love with this exotic corner on Myasnitskaya Street.

In Soviet times, the Tea Shop was confiscated by the Bolshevik government, and for a while became an apartment building. By 1990, the building was badly dilapidated. For twelve years, the best specialists worked on its restoration, and when the work was completed, litigation began over the ownership of the miracle house. To date, this question remains open.

Since time immemorial, the Tea House has been home to the rarest teas and coffees. Not much has changed since then. The Tea Coffee shop on Myasnitskaya, which currently operates in a historic building, offers more than eight hundred types of tea and more than three hundred varieties of coffee. Tea and coffee tastings are regularly held here, and there is also a pastry shop on site.

Sergey Perlov is a man who began to instill a tea drinking culture in Muscovites more than 100 years ago. He was one of the first in the capital to sell this overseas drink. At that time, no one knew that in just 50 years tea would become an integral part of the life of every Russian.

In 1875, Sergey Perlov, a representative of the eminent merchant dynasty, bought a plot for the construction of a store. He invited the famous architect of the capital Roman Klein, who by that time had developed many well-known projects — Borodinsky Bridge, the Muir and Merliz store (now TSUM) and much more. On the ruins of the old building, Klein erected a three-story residential building in the style of the late Renaissance.

In 1895, the merchant decided to diversify the facade in such a way as to indicate his ties with Chinese tea merchants. In addition, the capital's merchants were waiting for the arrival of the influential Qing dignitary Li Hongzhang. Perlov expected to impress the eminent guest, so he entrusted the project for the reconstruction of the building to the master of decorative arts Karl Gippius. The result exceeded all his expectations, and the Tea House was transformed beyond recognition. Chinese dragons, snakes, ornaments — every detail just shouted about the East. All materials were purchased in China and were used not only for exterior decoration, but also for the interior of the store. One of the key elements was the traditional pagoda tower. Despite the fact that an important dignitary ignored Perlov's efforts, Muscovites forever fell in love with this exotic corner on Myasnitskaya Street.

In Soviet times, the Tea Shop was confiscated by the Bolshevik government, and for a while became an apartment building. By 1990, the building was badly dilapidated. For twelve years, the best specialists worked on its restoration, and when the work was completed, litigation began over the ownership of the miracle house. To date, this question remains open.

Since time immemorial, the Tea House has been home to the rarest teas and coffees. Not much has changed since then. The Tea Coffee shop on Myasnitskaya, which currently operates in a historic building, offers more than eight hundred types of tea and more than three hundred varieties of coffee. Tea and coffee tastings are regularly held here, and there is also a pastry shop on site.

Sergey Perlov is a man who began to instill a tea drinking culture in Muscovites more than 100 years ago. He was one of the first in the capital to sell this overseas drink. At that time, no one knew that in just 50 years tea would become an integral part of the life of every Russian.

In 1875, Sergey Perlov, a representative of the eminent merchant dynasty, bought a plot for the construction of a store. He invited the famous architect of the capital Roman Klein, who by that time had developed many well-known projects — Borodinsky Bridge, the Muir and Merliz store (now TSUM) and much more. On the ruins of the old building, Klein erected a three-story residential building in the style of the late Renaissance.

In 1895, the merchant decided to diversify the facade in such a way as to indicate his ties with Chinese tea merchants. In addition, the capital's merchants were waiting for the arrival of the influential Qing dignitary Li Hongzhang. Perlov expected to impress the eminent guest, so he entrusted the project for the reconstruction of the building to the master of decorative arts Karl Gippius. The result exceeded all his expectations, and the Tea House was transformed beyond recognition. Chinese dragons, snakes, ornaments — every detail just shouted about the East. All materials were purchased in China and were used not only for exterior decoration, but also for the interior of the store. One of the key elements was the traditional pagoda tower. Despite the fact that an important dignitary ignored Perlov's efforts, Muscovites forever fell in love with this exotic corner on Myasnitskaya Street.

In Soviet times, the Tea Shop was confiscated by the Bolshevik government, and for a while became an apartment building. By 1990, the building was badly dilapidated. For twelve years, the best specialists worked on its restoration, and when the work was completed, litigation began over the ownership of the miracle house. To date, this question remains open.

Since time immemorial, the Tea House has been home to the rarest teas and coffees. Not much has changed since then. The Tea Coffee shop on Myasnitskaya, which currently operates in a historic building, offers more than eight hundred types of tea and more than three hundred varieties of coffee. Tea and coffee tastings are regularly held here, and there is also a pastry shop on site.

Adresse

st. Myasnitskaya 19

Emploi du temps

daily 10:00am — 8:00pm

Téléphone

+7 495 663-72-35

Site web

https://chai-cofe.com/

La Source

https://kudago.com/msk/place/chajnyj-dom-na-myasnickoj/

Carte

Visites de la ville